Something to know before visiting Venice Arsenale

The crown jewel of Serenissima Republic: Venice Arsenale

Venice Arsenale is a big area of Castello’s Sestiere where, super skilled workers produced the ships that made Venice navy and trade power that great.

Within the year 1100, marine craft were produced by small shipyards scattered between the islands of Venice lagoon and called “Squero”. They could produce those boats needed to cross the lagoon and no more.

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St. Mark’s Basilica in Venice – Basilica di San Marco

San Marco’s basement stands on the mud of Rivoalto’s island and the legends about Venice history.

While the resizing of eastern Roman’s Empire at the beginning of IX century, the Dodge Giustiniano Partcipazio thought necessary to update those traditions acquired from that culture, in order to build up the people spirit of belonging to the Republic of Venice.

The sunset of Byzantine influence, pushed Venice on the search for Its identity, starting from the patron of the city.

St.Mark, already venerated by the population, perfectly matched this role, mirroring Venecian’s values and devotion.

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Campo San Stae – Challenging Bernini

Campo San Stae – San Stae square

Campo San Stae owes its name to Sant Eustacchio church, which occupies the majority of it’s space pressing on the left the ancient Tiraoro and Battioro School that goes almost unnoticed for the statues which animate the facade of the church attracting the attention of visitors.

The church has very ancient origins and there are very few testimonies about its structure before Doge Alvise Mocenigo commissioned reconstruction at his own expense in the early 1700s.

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San Simeon Piccolo – the unexplored crypt

San Simeon Piccolo still keeps Its secrets

The church of San Simeon Piccolo in Venice welcomes visitors coming out from the train station, on the other side of Grand Canal.

Commissioned to make Venice “back-door” richer, the architect Scalfarotto found inspiration by Roman’s Pantheon temple and at the end of 1700 renewed this church as we can see it today.

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